Cabbage - [kab-ij] Chiefly British 1. a. cloth scraps that remain after a garment has been cut from a fabric and that by custom the tailor may claim. 2. slang - verb. To steal; pilfer: He cabbaged whole yards of cloth.

Cove - (kəʊv) Brit, Austral 1. old-fashioned , slang - a fellow; chap.

Cabbaging Cove: A scoundrel keen on pilfering [from the annals of not-so-distant history]!

About the Cabbaging Cove

  1. Les Sakharoffs
Alexander Sakharoff and Clotilde von Derp were a “mutually complimentary androgynous couple, united in dance, joined together in an act of artistic creation”. While Alexander was more traditionalist, Clotilde tended towards expressionist routines and modern music choices.
Painting for a promotional poster by George Barbier, 1921.

    Les Sakharoffs

    Alexander Sakharoff and Clotilde von Derp were a “mutually complimentary androgynous couple, united in dance, joined together in an act of artistic creation”. While Alexander was more traditionalist, Clotilde tended towards expressionist routines and modern music choices.

    Painting for a promotional poster by George Barbier, 1921.

  2. Red and Gold Evening GownGeorge Barbier designs, 1924.

    Red and Gold Evening Gown
    George Barbier designs, 1924.

  3. THE COVEY WOTS GOT A KNACK OF TAKING PEOPLE OFF
Caricature of death as a gentleman, standing on a tombstone.
Image:
Illustration by satirist G.S. Tregear, ca. 1820. Now at the Wellcome Library, London.

    THE COVEY WOTS GOT A KNACK OF TAKING PEOPLE OFF

    Caricature of death as a gentleman, standing on a tombstone.

    Image:

    Illustration by satirist G.S. Tregear, ca. 1820. Now at the Wellcome Library, London.

  4. Washington man sleeps in a blanketless bed.
Milton Fairchild of Washington, D.C., does not need any blankets for keeping him warm these winter nights. He has invented an electrical bed which does not require any covering for the body when asleep. Furthermore, according to Mr Fairchild, an “electric blanket” is healthier and one is not so susceptible to colds. The temperature is maintained constant throughout the night by automatic controls.
Library of Congress via Retronaut

    Washington man sleeps in a blanketless bed.

    Milton Fairchild of Washington, D.C., does not need any blankets for keeping him warm these winter nights. He has invented an electrical bed which does not require any covering for the body when asleep. Furthermore, according to Mr Fairchild, an “electric blanket” is healthier and one is not so susceptible to colds. The temperature is maintained constant throughout the night by automatic controls.

    Library of Congress via Retronaut

  5. "Afternoon dress"
Blend into the garden! Convince the bees you’re a flower!
Journal des dames et des modes Journal des dames et des modes, Plate 183. 1914.

    "Afternoon dress"

    Blend into the garden! Convince the bees you’re a flower!

    Journal des dames et des modes Journal des dames et des modes, Plate 183. 1914.

  6. "Saddle my hog, and bridle my dog."
  7. "Pray what do you want, miss?"
  8. "The Pennington Racing Tricycle"

    "The Pennington Racing Tricycle"

  9. historical-nonfiction:

The Boston Bread Riot happened in 1713, caused by massive food shortages and the high price of basic necessities, including of course bread. Some of the larger Boston merchants were exporting food, while the poor were starving. This made the poor angry. So they took to the streets, breaking into warehouses looking for grains. They even shot the lieutenant governor (he survived). And for the first time in my knowledge of riots it worked! The governor declared that exporting foods during famine-like conditions was illegal. He also fixed the prices of bread and grain temporarily, and even seized wheat from a ship that arrived later that year.  It was given to the local bakers, who were instructed to bake bread as quickly as possible and distribute it to the needy of the city.

    historical-nonfiction:

    The Boston Bread Riot happened in 1713, caused by massive food shortages and the high price of basic necessities, including of course bread. Some of the larger Boston merchants were exporting food, while the poor were starving. This made the poor angry. So they took to the streets, breaking into warehouses looking for grains. They even shot the lieutenant governor (he survived). And for the first time in my knowledge of riots it worked! The governor declared that exporting foods during famine-like conditions was illegal. He also fixed the prices of bread and grain temporarily, and even seized wheat from a ship that arrived later that year.  It was given to the local bakers, who were instructed to bake bread as quickly as possible and distribute it to the needy of the city.

    (Source: listverse.com)

  10. nae-design:

    Maruyama Ōkyo | 1733 - 1795

    Japanese already perfected “cute” and “manga” during 1700s - from one of master artists during edo era.

    (via darksilenceinsuburbia)

Imperial Theme by Kotoro