Cabbage - [kab-ij] Chiefly British 1. a. cloth scraps that remain after a garment has been cut from a fabric and that by custom the tailor may claim. 2. slang - verb. To steal; pilfer: He cabbaged whole yards of cloth.

Cove - (kəʊv) Brit, Austral 1. old-fashioned , slang - a fellow; chap.

Cabbaging Cove: A scoundrel keen on pilfering [from the annals of not-so-distant history]!

About the Cabbaging Cove

Posts tagged horses
  1. The 2013 Kentucky Derby will have one of the first black jockeys on a possible winner in decades - there have been black jockeys on horses with poor odds over the years, but they’re incredibly uncommon compared to the first decades of the Derbies. 
cabbagingcove:

Thoroughbred horse “Exile” with jockey
The Forgotten Athletes
One of the most overlooked aspects in the history of horse racing is the legacy of the African-American jockeys.
As thoroughbred horse racing first boomed in the Southern United States, slaves were the ones who cared for, lived with, and trained most of the horses. They were natural selections to be the ones who ran the horses in the races.
The Smithsonian magazine article linked above is a good overview of the position of non-whites on the track - even in the biggest races, like the Kentucky Derby, race was irrelevant. Only the colors of their silks (representing their stable) mattered. In fact, in the first Kentucky Derby (in 1875), thirteen of the fifteen jockeys were African-American, representing stables from both the North and the South.
Since the 1910s, however, African-American jockeys have been extremely scarce. Due to increasing racism and discrimination, many of the best jockeys of the late-19th century left for Europe, and both jockeyed and trained some of the best European (especially French) racing horses in history.
About the Horse
Exile was a thoroughbred born in the United States, with an English sire and French dam. He raced predominantly in the Northeast, and won the Twin City Handicap two years in a row. Most of his purses were for placing or showing, however. The Kentucky Derby winner for 1909, Wintergreen, was sired by Exile.
Source: Album of Celebrated American and English Racing Horses. Kinney Bros. Tobacco Company, 1888.

    The 2013 Kentucky Derby will have one of the first black jockeys on a possible winner in decades - there have been black jockeys on horses with poor odds over the years, but they’re incredibly uncommon compared to the first decades of the Derbies.

    cabbagingcove:

    Thoroughbred horse “Exile” with jockey

    The Forgotten Athletes

    One of the most overlooked aspects in the history of horse racing is the legacy of the African-American jockeys.

    As thoroughbred horse racing first boomed in the Southern United States, slaves were the ones who cared for, lived with, and trained most of the horses. They were natural selections to be the ones who ran the horses in the races.

    The Smithsonian magazine article linked above is a good overview of the position of non-whites on the track - even in the biggest races, like the Kentucky Derby, race was irrelevant. Only the colors of their silks (representing their stable) mattered. In fact, in the first Kentucky Derby (in 1875), thirteen of the fifteen jockeys were African-American, representing stables from both the North and the South.

    Since the 1910s, however, African-American jockeys have been extremely scarce. Due to increasing racism and discrimination, many of the best jockeys of the late-19th century left for Europe, and both jockeyed and trained some of the best European (especially French) racing horses in history.

    About the Horse

    Exile was a thoroughbred born in the United States, with an English sire and French dam. He raced predominantly in the Northeast, and won the Twin City Handicap two years in a row. Most of his purses were for placing or showing, however. The Kentucky Derby winner for 1909, Wintergreen, was sired by Exile.

    Source: Album of Celebrated American and English Racing Horses. Kinney Bros. Tobacco Company, 1888.

    (via stupidreblog)

  2. "The Two-Horse Act"
1874 Chromolithograph by Gibson & Co.

    "The Two-Horse Act"

    1874 Chromolithograph by Gibson & Co.

  3. Thoroughbred “Parole”
Parole was an American-born thoroughbred, foaled in 1873, with 138 starts, 59 wins, 28 places, and 17 shows (wins = 1st place, places = 2nd place, and shows = 3rd place). He earned $82,816 in his racing career, which is over $2,000,000 in today’s dollars. His stud fees after retirement brought in significant income to his owners, as well. His offspring were not as profitable as him.
Album of celebrated American and English running horses. 1888.

    Thoroughbred “Parole”

    Parole was an American-born thoroughbred, foaled in 1873, with 138 starts, 59 wins, 28 places, and 17 shows (wins = 1st place, places = 2nd place, and shows = 3rd place). He earned $82,816 in his racing career, which is over $2,000,000 in today’s dollars. His stud fees after retirement brought in significant income to his owners, as well. His offspring were not as profitable as him.

    Album of celebrated American and English running horses. 1888.

    (Source: archive.org)

  4. Gesattelter Brauner [“Saddled Bay Horse”]
In the 1840s, horse racing was by far the most popular spectator sport both in the United States and Europe, with major races attracting in excess of 60,000 spectators.
This 1848 painting by William Barrand is of an unknown horse, but is representative of the typical build of a thoroughbred of the day. Their lean build was not yet as greyhound-esque as today’s racehorses, but was still muscular, impressive, and built for speed. The Barb and Arabian influence in the breed are both clearly evident in this beautiful painting of a horse whose name has been lost to time.

    Gesattelter Brauner [“Saddled Bay Horse”]

    In the 1840s, horse racing was by far the most popular spectator sport both in the United States and Europe, with major races attracting in excess of 60,000 spectators.

    This 1848 painting by William Barrand is of an unknown horse, but is representative of the typical build of a thoroughbred of the day. Their lean build was not yet as greyhound-esque as today’s racehorses, but was still muscular, impressive, and built for speed. The Barb and Arabian influence in the breed are both clearly evident in this beautiful painting of a horse whose name has been lost to time.

  5. The horse doesn’t eat cucumber salad.
    — First sentence transmitted over Johann Philipp Reis’ telephonic device in 1861.  Technically it was “Das Pferd frisst keinen Gurkensalat,” but why quibble.  Read more about Reis and his cucumber salad obsession here. (via wnycradiolab)
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