Cabbage - [kab-ij] Chiefly British 1. a. cloth scraps that remain after a garment has been cut from a fabric and that by custom the tailor may claim. 2. slang - verb. To steal; pilfer: He cabbaged whole yards of cloth.

Cove - (kəʊv) Brit, Austral 1. old-fashioned , slang - a fellow; chap.

Cabbaging Cove: A scoundrel keen on pilfering [from the annals of not-so-distant history]!

About the Cabbaging Cove

Posts tagged politics
  1. my-ear-trumpet:

ayjay:

“The Long-Winded Speech,” at the British Museum

Caricature satirising the ‘long-winded speech’ of Whig politician Richard Brinsley Sheridan, 1788
  2. npr:

Nutmeg is a feel-good holiday spice found in cakes and cider, and even spiking our spinach, if we’re lucky. But it once caused serious bloodshed and may have even been a reason the Dutch were willing to part with Manhattan back in the 1600s.
No Innocent Spice: The Secret Story Of Nutmeg, Life And Death : The Salt 
Photo: Wiki Commons

    npr:

    Nutmeg is a feel-good holiday spice found in cakes and cider, and even spiking our spinach, if we’re lucky. But it once caused serious bloodshed and may have even been a reason the Dutch were willing to part with Manhattan back in the 1600s.

    No Innocent Spice: The Secret Story Of Nutmeg, Life And Death : The Salt

    Photo: Wiki Commons


    (via homofuck)

  3. thegildedcentury:

Life, July 17, 1944
Spot the woman and the black guy.

    thegildedcentury:

    Life, July 17, 1944

    Spot the woman and the black guy.

  4. ourpresidents:

Repeal of Prohibition - Elephants and Donkeys Celebrate Over a Barrel of Beer
 
During his 1932 presidential campaign, FDR promised to end Prohibition. The 18th Amendment to the Constitution, ratified in 1921, prohibited the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors within the United States.
When Roosevelt took office in 1933, a constitutional amendment to repeal Prohibition was already making its way through the state legislatures. Roosevelt acted immediately to ease Prohibition with the Beer-Wine Revenue Act. Passed on March 22, 1933, this act legalized the sale of alcoholic beverages containing no more than 3.2 percent alcohol (this level was declared non-intoxicating). Prohibition was officially repealed by the 21st Amendment on December 5, 1933.
This large, glass bowl commemorates the end of Prohibition with a series of seven vignettes imprinted in white, including a “G.O.P.” elephant and a “D.E.M.” donkey celebrating over a barrel of beer.  The etched caption reads, “At Last!”
-From the Roosevelt Library.  More at Today’s Document.

    ourpresidents:

    Repeal of Prohibition - Elephants and Donkeys Celebrate Over a Barrel of Beer

    During his 1932 presidential campaign, FDR promised to end Prohibition. The 18th Amendment to the Constitution, ratified in 1921, prohibited the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors within the United States.

    When Roosevelt took office in 1933, a constitutional amendment to repeal Prohibition was already making its way through the state legislatures. Roosevelt acted immediately to ease Prohibition with the Beer-Wine Revenue Act. Passed on March 22, 1933, this act legalized the sale of alcoholic beverages containing no more than 3.2 percent alcohol (this level was declared non-intoxicating). Prohibition was officially repealed by the 21st Amendment on December 5, 1933.

    This large, glass bowl commemorates the end of Prohibition with a series of seven vignettes imprinted in white, including a “G.O.P.” elephant and a “D.E.M.” donkey celebrating over a barrel of beer.  The etched caption reads, “At Last!”

    -From the Roosevelt Library.  More at Today’s Document.

    (via todaysdocument)

  5. biomedicalephemera:

C’mon down to the Isle of Pines! We’ve got cocoa beans!
The Isle of Pines was indefinitely leased to the US in the Platt Amendment, the same amendment that cordoned off the area that Guantanamo Bay is now located in.
However, unlike Guantanamo Bay, the Isle of Pines was reclaimed by the Cuban government when the new Cuban Constitution was drafted in 1940. It’s now called Isla de la Juventud. Despite its extremely good soil for planting and its ideal climate for tropical fruits, the Tropical Development Company never turned a profit from their developments there.
Prospectus of the Tropical Development Company, Founders of the American City and Colony of McKinley Isle of Pines. 1904.

    biomedicalephemera:

    C’mon down to the Isle of Pines! We’ve got cocoa beans!

    The Isle of Pines was indefinitely leased to the US in the Platt Amendment, the same amendment that cordoned off the area that Guantanamo Bay is now located in.

    However, unlike Guantanamo Bay, the Isle of Pines was reclaimed by the Cuban government when the new Cuban Constitution was drafted in 1940. It’s now called Isla de la Juventud. Despite its extremely good soil for planting and its ideal climate for tropical fruits, the Tropical Development Company never turned a profit from their developments there.

    Prospectus of the Tropical Development Company, Founders of the American City and Colony of McKinley Isle of Pines. 1904.

  6. ofpaperandponies:

todaysdocument:

Representative Jeannette Rankin (1880-1973), By Matzene, 1917; Courtesy of the Senate Historical Office
On November 7, 1916, Jeannette Rankin was the first woman elected to Congress, 4 years before woman suffrage was added to the Constitution in 1920 with the 19th Amendment. Since Rankin, there have been nearly 200 women elected to Congress.

/history editorialization
To me, Jeannette Rankin was one of the most impressive women in US history, and I’m not impressed by much. She felt privileged to have had such a good upbringing and education and always worked to make the world as good for others as she had it.
Rankin was strong suffragette (an organizer with the National American Women Suffrage Association), anti-war (“As a woman, I cannot go to war, and I refuse to send anybody else”), believed in the power of education to raise one’s standard of living, was an advocate for women’s health and nursing programs to reduce infant mortality, and was a supporter of child-protection laws. Initially a strong proponent of the temperance movement and Prohibition Act, she lost faith in the concept and admitted her error a couple of years after its inception, when violence and organized crime were rising alarmingly fast.
Thanks primarily to suffragette movements like NAWSA (and, in some cases, for reasons pertaining to attaining statehood), Montana women, and women throughout the west, had the right to vote before most of the country. Nevertheless, the population data for the state of Montana at the time shows that Rankin’s supporters would still have been, in vast majority, male.
Between her two terms in congress (she was elected again in 1940), she lobbied for the Sheppard-Towner Act (the first federal social welfare program to provide healthcare and assistance to women and children - unfortunately, repealed 8 years after its 1921 inception), was the Vice-President of the ACLU, and helped found the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. 
After her second term in congress, Rankin continued working for women’s rights, anti-war policies, and disarmament of countries. She traveled to India seven times between the late 1940s and her death in 1973, and was a student of Gandhian principles of non-violence and self-determination - lessons she emphasized in her anti-war and women’s rights speeches.
Her stance on active pacifism led to her to voting against engaging in the war in WWII, speaking out against the Korean war, and later, the Vietnam war. Despite this, she was always pushing the importance of buying War Bonds, because if we decided to send our boys over there, we absolutely needed to provide the best we could for them.
Even up to just three years before her death, Rankin was leading women on marches in Washington DC, against the war, against disenfranchisement of all sorts (racial, ethnic, gender, or religious), and pushing to end the US policy of getting militarily involved in conflicts that do not threaten us (though she did support aiding civilians and wounded combatants from both sides).
By the time Rankin died in 1973, at the age of 92, she had accomplished more than most people could in many lifetimes. She had stayed true to her principles throughout her life, but was not afraid to admit error when things were clearly not as she had expected them to be. There was no need to be married to be happy, and indeed, she never was. She was an anti-war fighter, a staunch advocate of women’s rights, and a true believer in the power of a solid education. She was elected twice, on those platforms (which she made clear in her campaign), as a Republican, and as an unmarried woman, in the state of Montana.
Montana has not elected a female representative since then. She would be laughed out of the Republican party, and be told she has to “be flexible” with her ideals and “work more with the other side” if she were to become a Democrat.
It’s depressing that people who truly break new ground and who stand firm (and DON’T “compromise”) for something that’s not a religion or a lobby would never make it in Congress today. 
/end history editorialization

    ofpaperandponies:

    todaysdocument:

    Representative Jeannette Rankin (1880-1973), By Matzene, 1917; Courtesy of the Senate Historical Office

    On November 7, 1916, Jeannette Rankin was the first woman elected to Congress, 4 years before woman suffrage was added to the Constitution in 1920 with the 19th Amendment. Since Rankin, there have been nearly 200 women elected to Congress.

    /history editorialization

    To me, Jeannette Rankin was one of the most impressive women in US history, and I’m not impressed by much. She felt privileged to have had such a good upbringing and education and always worked to make the world as good for others as she had it.

    Rankin was strong suffragette (an organizer with the National American Women Suffrage Association), anti-war (“As a woman, I cannot go to war, and I refuse to send anybody else”), believed in the power of education to raise one’s standard of living, was an advocate for women’s health and nursing programs to reduce infant mortality, and was a supporter of child-protection laws. Initially a strong proponent of the temperance movement and Prohibition Act, she lost faith in the concept and admitted her error a couple of years after its inception, when violence and organized crime were rising alarmingly fast.

    Thanks primarily to suffragette movements like NAWSA (and, in some cases, for reasons pertaining to attaining statehood), Montana women, and women throughout the west, had the right to vote before most of the country. Nevertheless, the population data for the state of Montana at the time shows that Rankin’s supporters would still have been, in vast majority, male.

    Between her two terms in congress (she was elected again in 1940), she lobbied for the Sheppard-Towner Act (the first federal social welfare program to provide healthcare and assistance to women and children - unfortunately, repealed 8 years after its 1921 inception), was the Vice-President of the ACLU, and helped found the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. 

    After her second term in congress, Rankin continued working for women’s rights, anti-war policies, and disarmament of countries. She traveled to India seven times between the late 1940s and her death in 1973, and was a student of Gandhian principles of non-violence and self-determination - lessons she emphasized in her anti-war and women’s rights speeches.

    Her stance on active pacifism led to her to voting against engaging in the war in WWII, speaking out against the Korean war, and later, the Vietnam war. Despite this, she was always pushing the importance of buying War Bonds, because if we decided to send our boys over there, we absolutely needed to provide the best we could for them.

    Even up to just three years before her death, Rankin was leading women on marches in Washington DC, against the war, against disenfranchisement of all sorts (racial, ethnic, gender, or religious), and pushing to end the US policy of getting militarily involved in conflicts that do not threaten us (though she did support aiding civilians and wounded combatants from both sides).

    By the time Rankin died in 1973, at the age of 92, she had accomplished more than most people could in many lifetimes. She had stayed true to her principles throughout her life, but was not afraid to admit error when things were clearly not as she had expected them to be. There was no need to be married to be happy, and indeed, she never was. She was an anti-war fighter, a staunch advocate of women’s rights, and a true believer in the power of a solid education. She was elected twice, on those platforms (which she made clear in her campaign), as a Republican, and as an unmarried woman, in the state of Montana.

    Montana has not elected a female representative since then. She would be laughed out of the Republican party, and be told she has to “be flexible” with her ideals and “work more with the other side” if she were to become a Democrat.

    It’s depressing that people who truly break new ground and who stand firm (and DON’T “compromise”) for something that’s not a religion or a lobby would never make it in Congress today. 

    /end history editorialization

  7. firsttimeuser:

Winston Churchill walks through the ruins of Coventry Cathedral, 1942
The History Of The 20th Century - BBC Archive

    firsttimeuser:

    Winston Churchill walks through the ruins of Coventry Cathedral, 1942

    The History Of The 20th Century - BBC Archive

    (via historyofeurope)

  8. arthistoryx:

Abraham Lincoln, 1860   
Matthew Brady 
Photographs of Lincoln always creep me out, just something about them that I can’t fully explain.

Before the beard. 

    arthistoryx:

    Abraham Lincoln, 1860  

    Matthew Brady 

    Photographs of Lincoln always creep me out, just something about them that I can’t fully explain.

    Before the beard. 

    (via drtuesdaygjohnson)

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