Cabbage - [kab-ij] Chiefly British 1. a. cloth scraps that remain after a garment has been cut from a fabric and that by custom the tailor may claim. 2. slang - verb. To steal; pilfer: He cabbaged whole yards of cloth.

Cove - (kəʊv) Brit, Austral 1. old-fashioned , slang - a fellow; chap.

Cabbaging Cove: A scoundrel keen on pilfering [from the annals of not-so-distant history]!

About the Cabbaging Cove

Posts tagged president
  1. mondeux reblogged your photo: theweekmagazine: In 1860, an 11-year-old girl…

    Not sure if this is at all true, but I sure hope so. Beards, they change the world.

    It is! As a skeptic of everything that seems “too cool to be true”, I checked out what went down regarding Lincoln’s beard - according to the Smithsonian museum, he *was* in fact contacted by a young girl via post, and subsequently changed his facial hair!

    Who knows if it was the ONLY reason or the primary reason why he changed his facial hair (according to his contemporaries, his wife was a *very* forceful and opinionated lady), but he did indeed change it after that letter.

  2. theweekmagazine:

In 1860, an 11-year-old girl wrote to Abe Lincoln, suggesting he grow a beard. He not only responded, he obliged.
“Hon A B Lincoln…
Dear Sir
My father has just home from the fair and brought home your picture and Mr. Hamlin’s. I am a little girl only 11 years old, but want you should be President of the United States very much so I hope you wont think me very bold to write to such a great man as you are. Have you any little girls about as large as I am if so give them my love and tell her to write to me if you cannot answer this letter. I have got 4 brothers and part of them will vote for you any way and if you let your whiskers grow I will try and get the rest of them to vote for you you would look a great deal better for your face is so thin. All the ladies like whiskers and they would tease their husbands to vote for you and then you would be President. My father is going to vote for you and if I was a man I would vote for you to but I will try to get every one to vote for you that I can I think that rail fence around your picture makes it look very pretty I have got a little baby sister she is nine weeks old and is just as cunning as can be. When you direct your letter direct to Grace Bedell Westfield Chautauqua County New York. 
I must not write any more answer this letter right off Good bye
Grace Bedell”
Lincoln responded a few days later: 
“Miss Grace Bedell
My dear little Miss 
Your very agreeable letter of the 15th is received — I regret the necessity of saying I have no daughters — I have three sons — one seventeen, one nine, and one seven years of age — They, with their mother, constitute my whole family — As to the whiskers, having never worn any, do you not think people would call it a piece of silly affectation if I were to begin it now? 
Your very sincere well wisher,
A. Lincoln”
While he made no promises about the beard to Bedell, he stopped shaving and allowed the beard to grow not long after their exchange and was elected as the 16th president of the United States a few weeks later. On his inaugural train ride from Illinois to Washington, D.C., the president-elect stopped in Bedell’s hometown of Westfield, N.Y., and asked to meet her.

    theweekmagazine:

    In 1860, an 11-year-old girl wrote to Abe Lincoln, suggesting he grow a beard. He not only responded, he obliged.

    “Hon A B Lincoln…

    Dear Sir

    My father has just home from the fair and brought home your picture and Mr. Hamlin’s. I am a little girl only 11 years old, but want you should be President of the United States very much so I hope you wont think me very bold to write to such a great man as you are. Have you any little girls about as large as I am if so give them my love and tell her to write to me if you cannot answer this letter. I have got 4 brothers and part of them will vote for you any way and if you let your whiskers grow I will try and get the rest of them to vote for you you would look a great deal better for your face is so thin. All the ladies like whiskers and they would tease their husbands to vote for you and then you would be President. My father is going to vote for you and if I was a man I would vote for you to but I will try to get every one to vote for you that I can I think that rail fence around your picture makes it look very pretty I have got a little baby sister she is nine weeks old and is just as cunning as can be. When you direct your letter direct to Grace Bedell Westfield Chautauqua County New York. 

    I must not write any more answer this letter right off Good bye

    Grace Bedell”

    Lincoln responded a few days later: 

    “Miss Grace Bedell

    My dear little Miss 

    Your very agreeable letter of the 15th is received — I regret the necessity of saying I have no daughters — I have three sons — one seventeen, one nine, and one seven years of age — They, with their mother, constitute my whole family — As to the whiskers, having never worn any, do you not think people would call it a piece of silly affectation if I were to begin it now? 

    Your very sincere well wisher,

    A. Lincoln”

    While he made no promises about the beard to Bedell, he stopped shaving and allowed the beard to grow not long after their exchange and was elected as the 16th president of the United States a few weeks later. On his inaugural train ride from Illinois to Washington, D.C., the president-elect stopped in Bedell’s hometown of Westfield, N.Y., and asked to meet her.

    (Source: theweek.com, via utnereader)

  3. biomedicalephemera:

Radiograph of Theodore Roosevelt, 1912.
In this 1912 x-ray, one can clearly see the bullet that hit Teddy Roosevelt in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 14, 1910, lodged right above his fourth rib on his right side. There is a small amount of shading surrounding the bullet, due to scar tissue buildup and the body’s natural attempts to encase foreign objects that it cannot remove.
Despite being shot, Roosevelt assumed he had not been hit in the lungs as he coughed no blood. He proceeded to give his 90-minute stump speech, though he prefaced it by stating,

Friends, I shall ask you to be as quiet as possible. I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose. But fortunately I had my manuscript, so you see I was going to make a long speech, and there is a bullet - there is where the bullet went through - and it probably saved me from it going into my heart. The bullet is in me now, so that I cannot make a very long speech, but I will try my best.

As the bullet pierced both his steel eyeglasses case and his speech notes before entering his body, it did not do significant damage, despite entering his lungs a solid two inches. Remembering the horrible complications that medical intervention had when William McKinley was shot by a bullet that would likely not have killed him, Teddy Roosevelt opted not to have the projectile removed. It never caused severe complications, and aside from a short recovery (two weeks time), never bothered Roosevelt to bear. He carried the bullet in his right lung to the day he died in 1919.
Image: George Grantham Bain Collection, United States Library of Congress.

    biomedicalephemera:

    Radiograph of Theodore Roosevelt, 1912.

    In this 1912 x-ray, one can clearly see the bullet that hit Teddy Roosevelt in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 14, 1910, lodged right above his fourth rib on his right side. There is a small amount of shading surrounding the bullet, due to scar tissue buildup and the body’s natural attempts to encase foreign objects that it cannot remove.

    Despite being shot, Roosevelt assumed he had not been hit in the lungs as he coughed no blood. He proceeded to give his 90-minute stump speech, though he prefaced it by stating,

    Friends, I shall ask you to be as quiet as possible. I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose. But fortunately I had my manuscript, so you see I was going to make a long speech, and there is a bullet - there is where the bullet went through - and it probably saved me from it going into my heart. The bullet is in me now, so that I cannot make a very long speech, but I will try my best.

    As the bullet pierced both his steel eyeglasses case and his speech notes before entering his body, it did not do significant damage, despite entering his lungs a solid two inches. Remembering the horrible complications that medical intervention had when William McKinley was shot by a bullet that would likely not have killed him, Teddy Roosevelt opted not to have the projectile removed. It never caused severe complications, and aside from a short recovery (two weeks time), never bothered Roosevelt to bear. He carried the bullet in his right lung to the day he died in 1919.

    Image: George Grantham Bain Collection, United States Library of Congress.

  4. Colonel Roosevelt and Colonel Rondon at Navaite, on the River of Doubt
Now that’s Roosevelt if I ever saw him!
The expedition down the Amazonian tributary known as the “River of Doubt” (now called the Rio Roosevelt), nearly killed old Bull Moose and was his final expedition. No non-natives were ever known to have traveled the extremely densely-forested tributary that the party followed, and the Roosevelt-Rondon Expedition faced a three-month long ordeal that would have left most people dead before even reaching the river’s edge.
By the end of the journey, Roosevelt had nearly died of malaria and a bacterial infection from a laceration (and if not for his son’s presence, had planned on taking his own life when he was suffering the most, with a fever of nearly 105 F), three men had died - two from drowning and one from another expedition member murdering him, the party was ill-nourished, and had all contracted malaria at least once.
That area of the Amazon River Basin is still one of the most densely-forested areas on the planet, and many of the the tribes who live there belong to some of the least-known cultures on earth.
Through the Brazilian Wilderness. Theodore Roosevelt, 1914.

    Colonel Roosevelt and Colonel Rondon at Navaite, on the River of Doubt

    Now that’s Roosevelt if I ever saw him!

    The expedition down the Amazonian tributary known as the “River of Doubt” (now called the Rio Roosevelt), nearly killed old Bull Moose and was his final expedition. No non-natives were ever known to have traveled the extremely densely-forested tributary that the party followed, and the Roosevelt-Rondon Expedition faced a three-month long ordeal that would have left most people dead before even reaching the river’s edge.

    By the end of the journey, Roosevelt had nearly died of malaria and a bacterial infection from a laceration (and if not for his son’s presence, had planned on taking his own life when he was suffering the most, with a fever of nearly 105 F), three men had died - two from drowning and one from another expedition member murdering him, the party was ill-nourished, and had all contracted malaria at least once.

    That area of the Amazon River Basin is still one of the most densely-forested areas on the planet, and many of the the tribes who live there belong to some of the least-known cultures on earth.

    Through the Brazilian Wilderness. Theodore Roosevelt, 1914.

  5. the-coriolis-effect:

    logoleptic:

    catbountry:

    drpepperr:

    baronvonehren:

    collegeahistory:

    picturesofwar:

    This day in history:

    Minutes before giving a speech on a campaign stop in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Theodore Roosevelt is shot in an assassination attempt.  

    The would-be assassin’s bullet is slowed down after travelling through a steel eyeglass case and the folded, fifty page speech he intended to give, stopping in his chest.  Realizing that he wasn’t coughing up blood, Roosevelt figured he was well enough to go ahead and deliver his speech rather than rush to the hospital.

    He spoke for the next 90 minutes, opening with the words:

    Ladies and gentlemen, I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose.”

    Doctors deemed it too risky to remove the bullet, and Roosevelt carried it with him inside his body for the rest of his life.

    October 14, 1912 - 99 years ago today. 

    I might just have to rewrite my essay on who was the most progressive president - Teddy is just too impressive, I kinda’ want to marry him.

    I think in the list of ‘most badass political figures’ he makes at least the top five okay.

    dang

    THIS MOTHERFUCKER.

    awesome.

    90 minute speech. 

    all memorized. 

    no telepromp. 

    no “and uhhh…..eerrr….ahhh…ummm” bullshit.

    AND a small caliber bullet in his chest.

    Teddy. i wish you were here to help us now.

    Just a tidbit, he DID have his speech written down, he had notes for it, that he wrote himself. In fact, the notes for the speech were the main reason that the bullet lost so much velocity before penetrating his chest. Of course, he couldn’t rightly USE those notes after, but he did have a very good idea of what they said, what with the having written them himself and all.

    Thank goodness the doctors didn’t decide to remove the bullet. Despite knowing about antiseptic and whatnot, technique in Teddy Roosevelt’s time was not exactly top-notch. I wouldn’t have been surprised to have seen him die an awful death like Garfield. :[

    (via onceyougoblack)

  6. mydaguerreotypeboyfriend:

Future president Rutherford B. Hayes in his early twenties, c. 1845. Ever wonder what was under all that beard? Now you know. Take note, Brooklyn. 
Submitted by Matthew Levine

    mydaguerreotypeboyfriend:

    Future president Rutherford B. Hayes in his early twenties, c. 1845. Ever wonder what was under all that beard? Now you know. Take note, Brooklyn. 

    Submitted by Matthew Levine

  7. arthistoryx:

Abraham Lincoln, 1860   
Matthew Brady 
Photographs of Lincoln always creep me out, just something about them that I can’t fully explain.

Before the beard. 

    arthistoryx:

    Abraham Lincoln, 1860  

    Matthew Brady 

    Photographs of Lincoln always creep me out, just something about them that I can’t fully explain.

    Before the beard. 

    (via drtuesdaygjohnson)

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