Cabbage - [kab-ij] Chiefly British 1. a. cloth scraps that remain after a garment has been cut from a fabric and that by custom the tailor may claim. 2. slang - verb. To steal; pilfer: He cabbaged whole yards of cloth.

Cove - (kəʊv) Brit, Austral 1. old-fashioned , slang - a fellow; chap.

Cabbaging Cove: A scoundrel keen on pilfering [from the annals of not-so-distant history]!

About the Cabbaging Cove

Posts tagged russia
  1. Отказ сватам — подношение тыквы. Малороссийский обычай. Дореволюционная открытка.
[Unsuccessful Matchmakers - Pumpkin Offering]
In Ukraine and Ukrainian Russia, there was long a custom of offering a hollow item, such as a hollowed-out pumpkin, teapot, or kettle, from a woman’s family to the matchmakers who set up an unsuccessful pairing between her and a man who employed them.
The male who was unsuccessful in wooing a woman seen as a good match was disparagingly called “Chainik”, which has made a comeback as a derogatory term towards technological “newbies”.

    Отказ сватам — подношение тыквы. Малороссийский обычай. Дореволюционная открытка.

    [Unsuccessful Matchmakers - Pumpkin Offering]

    In Ukraine and Ukrainian Russia, there was long a custom of offering a hollow item, such as a hollowed-out pumpkin, teapot, or kettle, from a woman’s family to the matchmakers who set up an unsuccessful pairing between her and a man who employed them.

    The male who was unsuccessful in wooing a woman seen as a good match was disparagingly called “Chainik”, which has made a comeback as a derogatory term towards technological “newbies”.

  2. Flowers as captured by Sergei Prokudin-Gorski

    Sunflowers, poppies, hydrangea, cornflowers, and asters, throughout the Russian Empire.

    From the Prokudin-Gorskii Collection, at the Library of Congress Digital Archives. 1909-1915.

  3. Russian types of Tartar [Tatar]; women of the Caucasus, Russia
Printed by Detroit Publishing Co., 1905.
US Library of Congress Digital Archives. Photochrom collection.

    Russian types of Tartar [Tatar]; women of the Caucasus, Russia

    Printed by Detroit Publishing Co., 1905.

    US Library of Congress Digital Archives. Photochrom collection.

  4. Traveling by Reindeer in Archangel, Russia.
A decade and a half after this photochrom was taken, my paternal great-grandfather was stationed in Archangel in the ill-advised attempts by the Allies to stave off the Red Army’s takeover of the country. 
Poorly-equipped and without reinforcements or supplies to survive the winter, the help of the North Russian people, who had lived off the rough land for generations, were the only reason most of the U.S. expeditionary force made it back alive.
Printed by Detroit Printing Co., 1905.
US Library of Congress Digital Archives. Photochrom collection.

    Traveling by Reindeer in Archangel, Russia.

    A decade and a half after this photochrom was taken, my paternal great-grandfather was stationed in Archangel in the ill-advised attempts by the Allies to stave off the Red Army’s takeover of the country.

    Poorly-equipped and without reinforcements or supplies to survive the winter, the help of the North Russian people, who had lived off the rough land for generations, were the only reason most of the U.S. expeditionary force made it back alive.

    Printed by Detroit Printing Co., 1905.

    US Library of Congress Digital Archives. Photochrom collection.

  5. The waterfall Orjechowoi Balkje, in Kisslowodzk [Kislovodsk], Russia
Printed by Detroit Publishing Co., 1905.
US Library of Congress Digital Archives. Photochrom collection.

    The waterfall Orjechowoi Balkje, in Kisslowodzk [Kislovodsk], Russia

    Printed by Detroit Publishing Co., 1905.

    US Library of Congress Digital Archives. Photochrom collection.

  6. Caricatures of Death Personified

    From a pre-Revolutionary magazine, first published in Russia in 1906. Illustrations by Boris Kustodiev.

    Personifications of death included depictions of the devastating 1906 drought and ensuing famine, and the ravages of cholera, in the midst of revolutionary uprisings in Moscow.

    (Source: commons.wikimedia.org)

  7. Tatar [Tartar] Women of the Caucasus, Russian Empire - ca. 1895
[source: Library of Congress Photocrom collection]

    Tatar [Tartar] Women of the Caucasus, Russian Empire - ca. 1895

    [source: Library of Congress Photocrom collection]

  8. oldrags:

    Costumes worn to the Romanov Anniversary Ball in 1903.  The theme of the lavish masked ball was the reign of Alexei of Russia, second ruler of the Romanov dynasty (1645-1676).  Some guests went so far as to actually wear original costumes from the period that were being stored at the Kremlin.

    Click thumbnails for identification.

  9. Ainu man (left), and Nivkh (Gilyak) couple
The Sakhalin Island has been claimed and re-claimed and “repatriated” between Japan and Russia almost as often as the Rhineland between France and Germany. The Ainu are traditionally considered “Japanese”, and the Gilyak are traditionally considered “Russian”, but both are independent tribal cultures who had little need for such labels.
Ethnographic Description of the Peoples of Russia. Gustav-Fedor Khristianovich Pauly, 1862.

    Ainu man (left), and Nivkh (Gilyak) couple

    The Sakhalin Island has been claimed and re-claimed and “repatriated” between Japan and Russia almost as often as the Rhineland between France and Germany. The Ainu are traditionally considered “Japanese”, and the Gilyak are traditionally considered “Russian”, but both are independent tribal cultures who had little need for such labels.

    Ethnographic Description of the Peoples of Russia. Gustav-Fedor Khristianovich Pauly, 1862.

  10. oldrags:

Anna Pavlova in costume for her Russian dance, 1910’s-20’s
Her headdress is an elaborate version of what is known as a kokoshnik.

    oldrags:

    Anna Pavlova in costume for her Russian dance, 1910’s-20’s

    Her headdress is an elaborate version of what is known as a kokoshnik.

Imperial Theme by Kotoro