Cabbage - [kab-ij] Chiefly British 1. a. cloth scraps that remain after a garment has been cut from a fabric and that by custom the tailor may claim. 2. slang - verb. To steal; pilfer: He cabbaged whole yards of cloth.

Cove - (kəʊv) Brit, Austral 1. old-fashioned , slang - a fellow; chap.

Cabbaging Cove: A scoundrel keen on pilfering [from the annals of not-so-distant history]!

About the Cabbaging Cove

Posts tagged science
  1. Map of the Square and Stationary Earth
"Four hundred pages in the bible that condemn the globe theory, or the flying earth, and none sustain it.
This is is the Bible Map of the world.”
Teach the controversy!
By Prof. Orlando Ferguson, 1893.

    Map of the Square and Stationary Earth

    "Four hundred pages in the bible that condemn the globe theory, or the flying earth, and none sustain it.

    This is is the Bible Map of the world.”

    Teach the controversy!

    By Prof. Orlando Ferguson, 1893.

  2.  “From a boiling bath of hot sulfuric acid, a laboratory technician lifts two rods of plastic. One has charred and deteriorated. The other-a rod of DuPont’s new Teflon tetrafluoroethylene resin-is not affected at all by the highly corrosive hot acid. Teflon resists the most corrosive acids and solvents to a degree unequaled by any other plastic. It is not attacked even by aqua regia which dissolves gold and platinum.”

    “From a boiling bath of hot sulfuric acid, a laboratory technician lifts two rods of plastic. One has charred and deteriorated. The other-a rod of DuPont’s new Teflon tetrafluoroethylene resin-is not affected at all by the highly corrosive hot acid. Teflon resists the most corrosive acids and solvents to a degree unequaled by any other plastic. It is not attacked even by aqua regia which dissolves gold and platinum.”

  3. jtotheizzoe:

    The Earliest Days of NASA

    Maria Popova, at Brain Pickings, happened upon a treasure trove of early NASA (and its airplane-only predecessor NACA) archive photos. They are really something. From biplanes to the Mercury capsule, pre-1950 aeronautics seemed to live by the motto of “If we build it, then we can go there.” That’s a sentiment we could use a bit more of.

    More here.

    (via itsfullofstars)

  4. collectivehistory:

Recipient of the world’s first human heart transplant, Louis Washkansky, in Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, three days after the surgery, December 6, 1967. 
Unfortunately, he died eighteen days after the transplant of pneumonia due to his weakened immune system.  

    collectivehistory:

    Recipient of the world’s first human heart transplant, Louis Washkansky, in Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, three days after the surgery, December 6, 1967. 

    Unfortunately, he died eighteen days after the transplant of pneumonia due to his weakened immune system.  

    (via collectivehistory-deactivated20)

  5. demonagerie:

Rylands Medieval Collection, Latin MS 53, f. 58v. Christianus Prolianus and Joachinus de Gigantibus (?), Astronomia (1478)
“Comparative view of the magnitudes of the Sun (a large disc of burnished gold), the Moon (silver), Mars (gold), Venus (gold), Mercury (gold) and Earth (pale). Framed in a green wreath of leaves and blue background.”

    demonagerie:

    Rylands Medieval Collection, Latin MS 53, f. 58v. Christianus Prolianus and Joachinus de Gigantibus (?), Astronomia (1478)

    “Comparative view of the magnitudes of the Sun (a large disc of burnished gold), the Moon (silver), Mars (gold), Venus (gold), Mercury (gold) and Earth (pale). Framed in a green wreath of leaves and blue background.”

    (via scientificillustration)

  6. my-ear-trumpet:

ayjay:

BLDGBlog

Way back in 1919, in their July 14th issue, Scientific American published an article on the discovery that trees can act “as nature’s own wireless towers and antenna combined.”
  7. "A Huge Lamp"

The marvelous arrangement of lenses and prisms which enables the lighthouse to send out its guiding flashes, with the mechanism for turning it. Made for “Chilang” lighthouse, China.

Marvels of Scientific Invention. Thomas W. Corbin, 1917.

    "A Huge Lamp"

    The marvelous arrangement of lenses and prisms which enables the lighthouse to send out its guiding flashes, with the mechanism for turning it. Made for “Chilang” lighthouse, China.

    Marvels of Scientific Invention. Thomas W. Corbin, 1917.

    (Source: archive.org)

  8. Today in History - May 14

    Ticrapo, Huancavelica Region, Peru, 1939

    On May 14, 1939, a girl named Lina Medina became the youngest recorded mother in history, at 5 years, 7 months, and 17 days of age.

    Originally thought to have a massive abdominal tumor that was growing at an alarming rate, Lina’s parents took her to the nearest hospital, where she was diagnosed as being seven months pregnant. The doctor who diagnosed her, Dr. Gerardo Lozada, took her to Lima, Peru, to a larger hospital, in order to have his diagnosis confirmed and to have Lina’s condition monitored.

    One-and-a-half months later, a caesarean-section was performed on the small girl, and her son Gerardo Medina was born. He was named after the doctor who delivered him, and who mentored and provided medical care to both Lina and the boy, after the birth and through their young adulthood. Until he was 10-years-old, Gerardo was raised to believe that his mom was really his sister, but after incessant teasing at school one year, the doctor and Lina told him the truth. By most accounts, he was a normal child, and fairly bright. He died at age 40, of an unrelated bone cancer.

    How did this happen?

    Well, precocious puberty isn’t all that uncommon, but extreme precocious puberty is. Some children with extreme precocious puberty reach menarche (first menstruation) at nine months or younger, and if this condition is allowed to continue, the body develops to the point where a full-term pregnancy is completely possible. Today, hormone-suppressing drugs are available, and many of the complications of precocious puberty (both psychological and physical) are avoided, but the early versions of these medications were both dangerous and not terribly effective.

    Lina had begun menstruating at eight-months-old, and began developing breast tissue at four-years-old. Though her hips had begun widening significantly beyond where they should be for a child her age, they were obviously nowhere near large enough to deliver a baby at just five-years-old.

    Of course, this still leads to the question of who would impregnate a five-year-old. Her father was initially arrested on suspicion of incest and rape, but the charges were dropped due to a lack of evidence. Other possibilities included her mentally-deficient older brother, an uncle, or one of the village men, during an Andean fertility festival. Lina herself never gave a clear answer to who impregnated her, and it’s completely possible that she herself doesn’t know.

    Lina Today

    Lina Medina had a second son in 1972, almost 33 years after her first. She is still alive today, in a poor section of Lima, Peru, and lives with her husband Raul Jurado. Despite living in relative poverty, she refuses media and publicity as much as possible, and prefers her privacy over fiscal gain.

    Read More about Lina Medina:

    LINA MEDINA, MADRE A LOS CINCO AÑOS

    Youngest Mother @ DamnInteresting

    Youngest Mother? by Snopes

    Time Magazine: Little Mother [similar case]

    Calcutta Telegraph

    All images from listed sources.

  9. Today in History - May 14
Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England, 1796
On May 14, 1796, Edward Jenner performed the first of his 23 case studies involving inoculating people with cowpox (Vaccinia virus) in order to protect them from the worst effects of smallpox (Variola virus).
Dr. Jenner took the pus from a blister on the hand of milkmaid Sarah Nelmes, who had contracted cowpox from a cow named Blossom. He then injected this virus into eight-year-old James Phipps, allowing him to develop cowpox (similar to, but far less deadly than smallpox), and once he was healed, exposed him to smallpox. When James developed no symptoms, Edward Jenner presented a paper proposing widespread vaccination against smallpox to the Royal Society of London.
Both clergy and traditional physicians expressed credulity and disgust at the idea, despite the fact that it had been shown decades earlier to be a plausible concept - in 1721 Lady Mary Wortley Montagu had herself and her children inoculated with cowpox sores after witnessing the procedure in Istanbul, and not 20 years earlier, Dr. Benjamin Jesty had success inoculating himself and his wife with cowpox during a particularly deadly smallpox outbreak.
More recent studies have shown that the practice of cowpox inoculation against smallpox may have occurred in China over 2500 years ago, but it was never widespread, and the west never truly caught on to the idea until Dr. Jenner proved with twenty-two subsequent subjects (including his own 11-month-old son) that cowpox inoculation was effective and far safer than smallpox itself. Following his second presentation on the subject at the Royal Society of London (including the case studies of his own family), the concept was still widely ridiculed by clergy and some of the public, but the efficacy was no longer seen as a matter of being an “Old Wives Tale”.
Despite his being far from the first to assert the value of vaccination, Edward Jenner is still seen as the one who saved "more lives than anyone else in human history", because he’s the one who persisted and found a way to convince the community at large of the efficacy of the procedure. After all, in the words of Francis Galton,

In science, credit goes to the man who first convinces the world, not the man to whom the idea first occurs.

More on Edward Jenner and Smallpox:
Edward Jenner at Columbia University
BBC History: Edward Jenner 
History Learning Site: Edward Jenner
Proceedings of the Baylor University Medical Center: Edward Jenner and the history of smallpox and vaccination

    Today in History - May 14

    Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England, 1796

    On May 14, 1796, Edward Jenner performed the first of his 23 case studies involving inoculating people with cowpox (Vaccinia virus) in order to protect them from the worst effects of smallpox (Variola virus).

    Dr. Jenner took the pus from a blister on the hand of milkmaid Sarah Nelmes, who had contracted cowpox from a cow named Blossom. He then injected this virus into eight-year-old James Phipps, allowing him to develop cowpox (similar to, but far less deadly than smallpox), and once he was healed, exposed him to smallpox. When James developed no symptoms, Edward Jenner presented a paper proposing widespread vaccination against smallpox to the Royal Society of London.

    Both clergy and traditional physicians expressed credulity and disgust at the idea, despite the fact that it had been shown decades earlier to be a plausible concept - in 1721 Lady Mary Wortley Montagu had herself and her children inoculated with cowpox sores after witnessing the procedure in Istanbul, and not 20 years earlier, Dr. Benjamin Jesty had success inoculating himself and his wife with cowpox during a particularly deadly smallpox outbreak.

    More recent studies have shown that the practice of cowpox inoculation against smallpox may have occurred in China over 2500 years ago, but it was never widespread, and the west never truly caught on to the idea until Dr. Jenner proved with twenty-two subsequent subjects (including his own 11-month-old son) that cowpox inoculation was effective and far safer than smallpox itself. Following his second presentation on the subject at the Royal Society of London (including the case studies of his own family), the concept was still widely ridiculed by clergy and some of the public, but the efficacy was no longer seen as a matter of being an “Old Wives Tale”.

    Despite his being far from the first to assert the value of vaccination, Edward Jenner is still seen as the one who saved "more lives than anyone else in human history", because he’s the one who persisted and found a way to convince the community at large of the efficacy of the procedure. After all, in the words of Francis Galton,

    In science, credit goes to the man who first convinces the world, not the man to whom the idea first occurs.

    More on Edward Jenner and Smallpox:

    Edward Jenner at Columbia University

    BBC History: Edward Jenner

    History Learning Site: Edward Jenner

    Proceedings of the Baylor University Medical Center: Edward Jenner and the history of smallpox and vaccination

  10. jtotheizzoe:

    Vintage Space Travel Posters

    From the genius (I think it’s safe to call him that) that brought us those awesome Star Wars travel posters, Steve Thomas, comes a collection of planetary vacation advertisements. Come to think of it, these may predate the Star Wars ones, but that’s not important right now.

    Despite the scientific impossibility of the artwork (skiing on Pluto would be difficult with 8% of Earth’s gravity), they invite dreams of a manned era in solar system exploration that I think we can all support.

    If you like Steve’s art, visit his store and purchase posters, iPhone cases or postcards of these works and many more.

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