Cabbage - [kab-ij] Chiefly British 1. a. cloth scraps that remain after a garment has been cut from a fabric and that by custom the tailor may claim. 2. slang - verb. To steal; pilfer: He cabbaged whole yards of cloth.

Cove - (kəʊv) Brit, Austral 1. old-fashioned , slang - a fellow; chap.

Cabbaging Cove: A scoundrel keen on pilfering [from the annals of not-so-distant history]!

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Posts tagged teddy roosevelt
  1. biomedicalephemera:

Radiograph of Theodore Roosevelt, 1912.
In this 1912 x-ray, one can clearly see the bullet that hit Teddy Roosevelt in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 14, 1910, lodged right above his fourth rib on his right side. There is a small amount of shading surrounding the bullet, due to scar tissue buildup and the body’s natural attempts to encase foreign objects that it cannot remove.
Despite being shot, Roosevelt assumed he had not been hit in the lungs as he coughed no blood. He proceeded to give his 90-minute stump speech, though he prefaced it by stating,

Friends, I shall ask you to be as quiet as possible. I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose. But fortunately I had my manuscript, so you see I was going to make a long speech, and there is a bullet - there is where the bullet went through - and it probably saved me from it going into my heart. The bullet is in me now, so that I cannot make a very long speech, but I will try my best.

As the bullet pierced both his steel eyeglasses case and his speech notes before entering his body, it did not do significant damage, despite entering his lungs a solid two inches. Remembering the horrible complications that medical intervention had when William McKinley was shot by a bullet that would likely not have killed him, Teddy Roosevelt opted not to have the projectile removed. It never caused severe complications, and aside from a short recovery (two weeks time), never bothered Roosevelt to bear. He carried the bullet in his right lung to the day he died in 1919.
Image: George Grantham Bain Collection, United States Library of Congress.

    biomedicalephemera:

    Radiograph of Theodore Roosevelt, 1912.

    In this 1912 x-ray, one can clearly see the bullet that hit Teddy Roosevelt in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 14, 1910, lodged right above his fourth rib on his right side. There is a small amount of shading surrounding the bullet, due to scar tissue buildup and the body’s natural attempts to encase foreign objects that it cannot remove.

    Despite being shot, Roosevelt assumed he had not been hit in the lungs as he coughed no blood. He proceeded to give his 90-minute stump speech, though he prefaced it by stating,

    Friends, I shall ask you to be as quiet as possible. I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose. But fortunately I had my manuscript, so you see I was going to make a long speech, and there is a bullet - there is where the bullet went through - and it probably saved me from it going into my heart. The bullet is in me now, so that I cannot make a very long speech, but I will try my best.

    As the bullet pierced both his steel eyeglasses case and his speech notes before entering his body, it did not do significant damage, despite entering his lungs a solid two inches. Remembering the horrible complications that medical intervention had when William McKinley was shot by a bullet that would likely not have killed him, Teddy Roosevelt opted not to have the projectile removed. It never caused severe complications, and aside from a short recovery (two weeks time), never bothered Roosevelt to bear. He carried the bullet in his right lung to the day he died in 1919.

    Image: George Grantham Bain Collection, United States Library of Congress.

  2. Nhambiquara child with pet monkey and Nhambiquara man with traditional piercings
"Nhambiquara" is the area deep within Mato Grosso that this tribe of natives lived in, as well as the name of the tribe that’s referred to in this part of Roosevelt’s book, but from what I can tell, there have always been two tribes in that specific area, and I’m not sure which one of them these two individuals belong to.
Keeping pets was (and still is) a big thing among Amazonian Indians. Despite the fact that they often eat the same species of animal for food, when they adopt orphaned infants, or “friendly” animals that follow their camps for food, the pets become an important and loved part of the family, cared for as well as any child.
Through the Brazilian Wilderness. Theodore Roosevelt, 1914.

    Nhambiquara child with pet monkey and Nhambiquara man with traditional piercings

    "Nhambiquara" is the area deep within Mato Grosso that this tribe of natives lived in, as well as the name of the tribe that’s referred to in this part of Roosevelt’s book, but from what I can tell, there have always been two tribes in that specific area, and I’m not sure which one of them these two individuals belong to.

    Keeping pets was (and still is) a big thing among Amazonian Indians. Despite the fact that they often eat the same species of animal for food, when they adopt orphaned infants, or “friendly” animals that follow their camps for food, the pets become an important and loved part of the family, cared for as well as any child.

    Through the Brazilian Wilderness. Theodore Roosevelt, 1914.

  3. the-coriolis-effect:

    logoleptic:

    catbountry:

    drpepperr:

    baronvonehren:

    collegeahistory:

    picturesofwar:

    This day in history:

    Minutes before giving a speech on a campaign stop in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Theodore Roosevelt is shot in an assassination attempt.  

    The would-be assassin’s bullet is slowed down after travelling through a steel eyeglass case and the folded, fifty page speech he intended to give, stopping in his chest.  Realizing that he wasn’t coughing up blood, Roosevelt figured he was well enough to go ahead and deliver his speech rather than rush to the hospital.

    He spoke for the next 90 minutes, opening with the words:

    Ladies and gentlemen, I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose.”

    Doctors deemed it too risky to remove the bullet, and Roosevelt carried it with him inside his body for the rest of his life.

    October 14, 1912 - 99 years ago today. 

    I might just have to rewrite my essay on who was the most progressive president - Teddy is just too impressive, I kinda’ want to marry him.

    I think in the list of ‘most badass political figures’ he makes at least the top five okay.

    dang

    THIS MOTHERFUCKER.

    awesome.

    90 minute speech. 

    all memorized. 

    no telepromp. 

    no “and uhhh…..eerrr….ahhh…ummm” bullshit.

    AND a small caliber bullet in his chest.

    Teddy. i wish you were here to help us now.

    Just a tidbit, he DID have his speech written down, he had notes for it, that he wrote himself. In fact, the notes for the speech were the main reason that the bullet lost so much velocity before penetrating his chest. Of course, he couldn’t rightly USE those notes after, but he did have a very good idea of what they said, what with the having written them himself and all.

    Thank goodness the doctors didn’t decide to remove the bullet. Despite knowing about antiseptic and whatnot, technique in Teddy Roosevelt’s time was not exactly top-notch. I wouldn’t have been surprised to have seen him die an awful death like Garfield. :[

    (via onceyougoblack)

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