Cabbage - [kab-ij] Chiefly British 1. a. cloth scraps that remain after a garment has been cut from a fabric and that by custom the tailor may claim. 2. slang - verb. To steal; pilfer: He cabbaged whole yards of cloth.

Cove - (kəʊv) Brit, Austral 1. old-fashioned , slang - a fellow; chap.

Cabbaging Cove: A scoundrel keen on pilfering [from the annals of not-so-distant history]!

About the Cabbaging Cove

Posts tagged theodore roosevelt
  1. biomedicalephemera:

Radiograph of Theodore Roosevelt, 1912.
In this 1912 x-ray, one can clearly see the bullet that hit Teddy Roosevelt in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 14, 1910, lodged right above his fourth rib on his right side. There is a small amount of shading surrounding the bullet, due to scar tissue buildup and the body’s natural attempts to encase foreign objects that it cannot remove.
Despite being shot, Roosevelt assumed he had not been hit in the lungs as he coughed no blood. He proceeded to give his 90-minute stump speech, though he prefaced it by stating,

Friends, I shall ask you to be as quiet as possible. I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose. But fortunately I had my manuscript, so you see I was going to make a long speech, and there is a bullet - there is where the bullet went through - and it probably saved me from it going into my heart. The bullet is in me now, so that I cannot make a very long speech, but I will try my best.

As the bullet pierced both his steel eyeglasses case and his speech notes before entering his body, it did not do significant damage, despite entering his lungs a solid two inches. Remembering the horrible complications that medical intervention had when William McKinley was shot by a bullet that would likely not have killed him, Teddy Roosevelt opted not to have the projectile removed. It never caused severe complications, and aside from a short recovery (two weeks time), never bothered Roosevelt to bear. He carried the bullet in his right lung to the day he died in 1919.
Image: George Grantham Bain Collection, United States Library of Congress.

    biomedicalephemera:

    Radiograph of Theodore Roosevelt, 1912.

    In this 1912 x-ray, one can clearly see the bullet that hit Teddy Roosevelt in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 14, 1910, lodged right above his fourth rib on his right side. There is a small amount of shading surrounding the bullet, due to scar tissue buildup and the body’s natural attempts to encase foreign objects that it cannot remove.

    Despite being shot, Roosevelt assumed he had not been hit in the lungs as he coughed no blood. He proceeded to give his 90-minute stump speech, though he prefaced it by stating,

    Friends, I shall ask you to be as quiet as possible. I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose. But fortunately I had my manuscript, so you see I was going to make a long speech, and there is a bullet - there is where the bullet went through - and it probably saved me from it going into my heart. The bullet is in me now, so that I cannot make a very long speech, but I will try my best.

    As the bullet pierced both his steel eyeglasses case and his speech notes before entering his body, it did not do significant damage, despite entering his lungs a solid two inches. Remembering the horrible complications that medical intervention had when William McKinley was shot by a bullet that would likely not have killed him, Teddy Roosevelt opted not to have the projectile removed. It never caused severe complications, and aside from a short recovery (two weeks time), never bothered Roosevelt to bear. He carried the bullet in his right lung to the day he died in 1919.

    Image: George Grantham Bain Collection, United States Library of Congress.

  2. Nhambiquara child with pet monkey and Nhambiquara man with traditional piercings
"Nhambiquara" is the area deep within Mato Grosso that this tribe of natives lived in, as well as the name of the tribe that’s referred to in this part of Roosevelt’s book, but from what I can tell, there have always been two tribes in that specific area, and I’m not sure which one of them these two individuals belong to.
Keeping pets was (and still is) a big thing among Amazonian Indians. Despite the fact that they often eat the same species of animal for food, when they adopt orphaned infants, or “friendly” animals that follow their camps for food, the pets become an important and loved part of the family, cared for as well as any child.
Through the Brazilian Wilderness. Theodore Roosevelt, 1914.

    Nhambiquara child with pet monkey and Nhambiquara man with traditional piercings

    "Nhambiquara" is the area deep within Mato Grosso that this tribe of natives lived in, as well as the name of the tribe that’s referred to in this part of Roosevelt’s book, but from what I can tell, there have always been two tribes in that specific area, and I’m not sure which one of them these two individuals belong to.

    Keeping pets was (and still is) a big thing among Amazonian Indians. Despite the fact that they often eat the same species of animal for food, when they adopt orphaned infants, or “friendly” animals that follow their camps for food, the pets become an important and loved part of the family, cared for as well as any child.

    Through the Brazilian Wilderness. Theodore Roosevelt, 1914.

  3. Colonel Roosevelt and Colonel Rondon at Navaite, on the River of Doubt
Now that’s Roosevelt if I ever saw him!
The expedition down the Amazonian tributary known as the “River of Doubt” (now called the Rio Roosevelt), nearly killed old Bull Moose and was his final expedition. No non-natives were ever known to have traveled the extremely densely-forested tributary that the party followed, and the Roosevelt-Rondon Expedition faced a three-month long ordeal that would have left most people dead before even reaching the river’s edge.
By the end of the journey, Roosevelt had nearly died of malaria and a bacterial infection from a laceration (and if not for his son’s presence, had planned on taking his own life when he was suffering the most, with a fever of nearly 105 F), three men had died - two from drowning and one from another expedition member murdering him, the party was ill-nourished, and had all contracted malaria at least once.
That area of the Amazon River Basin is still one of the most densely-forested areas on the planet, and many of the the tribes who live there belong to some of the least-known cultures on earth.
Through the Brazilian Wilderness. Theodore Roosevelt, 1914.

    Colonel Roosevelt and Colonel Rondon at Navaite, on the River of Doubt

    Now that’s Roosevelt if I ever saw him!

    The expedition down the Amazonian tributary known as the “River of Doubt” (now called the Rio Roosevelt), nearly killed old Bull Moose and was his final expedition. No non-natives were ever known to have traveled the extremely densely-forested tributary that the party followed, and the Roosevelt-Rondon Expedition faced a three-month long ordeal that would have left most people dead before even reaching the river’s edge.

    By the end of the journey, Roosevelt had nearly died of malaria and a bacterial infection from a laceration (and if not for his son’s presence, had planned on taking his own life when he was suffering the most, with a fever of nearly 105 F), three men had died - two from drowning and one from another expedition member murdering him, the party was ill-nourished, and had all contracted malaria at least once.

    That area of the Amazon River Basin is still one of the most densely-forested areas on the planet, and many of the the tribes who live there belong to some of the least-known cultures on earth.

    Through the Brazilian Wilderness. Theodore Roosevelt, 1914.

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